Monday, 30 June 2014

NEW QUAY




This year marks the centenary of the birth of Dylan Thomas, who was born on 27 October 1914, so there's never been a better time to pay a visit to New Quay, where the poet lived for a short time during the Second World War.  True to form, he had a favourite pub, the Black Lion, where he spent a large portion of his time while in New Quay.  He wrote a number of poems while living in the town, including 'Vision and Prayer', 'Poem in October' and 'Fern Hill', and New Quay is thought to have been the inspiration for the location featured in Under Milk Wood, although the characters were allegedly drawn from Laugharne in Camarthenshire, where he also lived for a while.  Those who want to follow in his footsteps can take the Dylan Thomas Trail, a walk around New Quay taking in the places featured in his poem.

Like many places on the Welsh coast, New Quay once had a thriving economy based around shipbuilding and fishing, but nowadays these activities have been replaced by tourism.  As well as the picturesque harbour, there are three beaches: Harbour Beach, Traeth Gwyn and Dolau.  Waterborne activities are on offer at Cardigan Bay Watersports, and there is a Yacht Club.  The Cardigan Bay Regatta takes place in August.  Due to its biological makeup, Cardigan Bay is an important environment for marine wildlife, and this is showcased in the Cardigan Bay Marine Wildlife Centre.  The centre also runs boat trips to look for bird colonies, seals and if you are lucky, bottle-nosed dolphins and Porpoise.  Sadly, the cetaceans were playing hide and seek the day we did the trip, but it was a lovely boat trip anyway.  Just outside the town, the New Quay Honey Farm has an exhibition on honey bees as well as a shop and tearoom.  

The New Quay Music Festival takes place on the first weekend in August this year, with some names from the past including Toyah and Hazel O'Connor.  For other events in the town see here.

Map of the area.

File:New Quay Harbour - geograph.org.uk - 558613.jpg
Photo by Des Adams, via Wikimedia Commons

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